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General Interest: ‘What did the doctor say?’ - A Simple Question with a Difficult Answer

General Interest: ‘What did the doctor say?’ - A Simple Question with a Difficult Answer
By: Richard Klasco and Lewis H. Glinert, The Washington Post
Submitted by: Ken Conselyea, , SP Ohio State University

Few simple questions are as difficult to answer as the perennial “What did the doctor say?” The words are so natural as to be virtually automatic. They spring from our lips, almost of their own accord, whenever a loved one returns from a doctor’s visit. Whether we recognize it or not, the answer has the potential to make us face our own mortality. Read the full article in The Washington Post here.

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General Interest: The word is out! ASPE Standards of Best Practice publication receives praise from Advances in Simulation Journal

General Interest: The word is out! ASPE Standards of Best Practice publication receives praise from Advances in Simulation Journal
By: Valerie Fulmer, ASPE President

Many of you know of our recent Standards of Best Practice (SOBP) publication in the international journal Advances in Simulation. These standards establish a baseline for best practice in SP methodology essential to this new field and all programs working with SPs. A living document, the SOBP will continue to blossom and grow to serve this community of SP educators and others around the world.

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General Interest: UofL School of Medicine to Host IMPROV FOR CLINICIANS Clinic with The Second City

General Interest: UofL School of Medicine to Host IMPROV FOR CLINICIANS Clinic with The Second City
By: Rob Stein, NPR
Submitted by: Michael Maury, UCSD School of Medicine

Here is another example of how theatrical improvisation is being used to help clinicians improve their communications skills. This article calls attention to students at the University of Louisville School of Medicine who teamed up with a Second City comedy troupe to partake in its “improv for Clinicians” workshop. "Improv for Clinicians" is meant to mirror the clinical experience that students, residents and faculty experience at the UofL School of Medicine, but with an entertaining and humorous twist.”  Might all medical schools benefit from similar workshops? Read about the event that occurred last fall at Broadwayworld.com here and let the creative ideas flow.

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General Interest: Words That Keep Mental Health Stigma Alive

General Interest: Words That Keep Mental Health Stigma Alive
By: Angela E. Gambrel
Submitted by: Dan Brown, Emory School of Medicine

This is a companion/follow-up post to the blog entry posted on December 18 regarding the misuse of mental health terms. This piece delves into an interested historical perspective on how “lunatic,” “imbecile,” and other words now used exclusively as insults were once medical terms. Read the full article at HealthyPlace.com  here.

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General Interest: You, Me and Them - Experiencing Discrimination in America - Scientists Work To Overcome Legacy of Tuskegee Study, Henrietta Lacks

General Interest: You, Me and Them - Experiencing Discrimination in America - Scientists Work To Overcome Legacy of Tuskegee Study, Henrietta Lacks
By: Rob Stein, NPR
Submitted by: Michael Maury, UCSD School of Medicine

This article gives us good food for thought. That is, what are we doing as Standardized Patient Educators to take a stand for equality in health care? Are we creating SP cases that represent all people of various ethnicities and cultural backgrounds? Or, are we only creating cases that are easier for us to cast based on our current SP pools?

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General Interest: HealthySimulation.com Relaunches Medical Simulation Resource Website and Newsletter

General Interest: HealthySimulation.com Relaunches Medical Simulation Resource Website and Newsletter
Submitted by: Lance Bailey

After seven months of hard work, the newly redeveloped Healthcare Simulation resource website HealthySimulation.com has finally launched! Not only has the website, newsletter, and branding been updated with a modern professional aesthetic, but also has given brand new functionality to better serve you the latest in medical simulation news, product information, conference coverage, research highlights, tutorial insights, and more! Features on the website include searching and posting for medical simulation jobs, finding healthcare simulation vendors, submitting articles to share with a global community, and subscribing to the Healthy Simulation Newsletter. Read about the relaunched website and new features here.

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General Interest: Innovative UCSD Program Aims to Draw Compassion Out of Future Doctors

General Interest: Innovative UCSD Program Aims to Draw Compassion Out of Future Doctors
By: Kinsee Morlan
Submitted by: Michael Maury, UCSD School of Medicine

As Standardized Patient Educators one of our many tasks is to foster and build empathy within our student doctors. We can accomplish this in many different ways. Since many of us in the SP world come from theatrical backgrounds, we are aware of the value of the performing arts in building compassion toward others. We know that acting and theatre has a built-in empathic element which can be passed on to any learner who is open and willing to partake whole-heartedly in theatre games and improvisational exercises. What if there were other artistic endeavors that could accomplish this goal as well? In fact, there are such opportunities and in this article, author Kinsee Morlan describes an artist-in-residency program at the UC San Diego School of Medicine that has students sketch live nude models, real human skeletons and eventually cadavers helping them focus on details that build their abilities for empathy and compassion. Created by artist Joyce Cutler-Shaw and now currently taught by Larry and Debbie Kline, “the goal of the drawing class is not to turn doctors into artists, but to build empathy through art. The students will go on to be doctors, and the goal is to make them doctors who care.” Read the full article in Voice of San Diego here.

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General Interest: Essential Reflective Writing Resource: Pulse--Voices from the Heart of Medicine

General Interest: Essential Reflective Writing Resource: Pulse--Voices from the Heart of Medicine
By: Paul Gross, MD, as submitted to DR-ED Listserv
Forwarded with permission by: Todd Lash, Publications Committee Chair

Pulse--voices from the heart of medicine, an online publication launched by Department of Family Medicine at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in 2008, now has over 11,000 subscribers.

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General Interest: OCD, Bipolar, Schizophrenic and the Misuse of Mental Health Terms

General Interest: OCD, Bipolar, Schizophrenic and the Misuse of Mental Health Terms
By: Jon Kelly and Denise Winterman
Submitted by: Dan Brown, Emory School of Medicine

If you jokingly, metaphorically, describe yourself as “OCD,” or “schizophrenic,” or “bipolar,” you could be doing a disservice to those who are clinically diagnosed with these challenging conditions, argue Kelly and Winterman. The misuse of these terms leads to a public misunderstanding of the diagnoses, and can contribute to stigmatization of mental illness. Some sufferers appreciate the increased awareness of the conditions, even if it’s misguided, but as educators in the medical field, it’s advisable to avoid using diagnostic terms in a metaphorical sense. Read the full article at BBC News Magazine here.

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General Interest: Mindfulness Apps Aim To Help People Disconnect From Stress

By: Allison Aubrey
Submitted by: Michael Maury, UCSD School of Medicine

As we fearlessly roller skate through our busy everyday lives, it is good to remember that there are great practices that can help us manage any stress that may invade our body and mind. Meditation has long been an important relaxing practice that helps individuals remain present and calm in the moment. As of late, Mindfulness Meditation has been a hot topic for many to help cope with the raucous rumblings that our world is witnessing. In this NPR news segment, Allison Aubrey makes note of some helpful downloadable Apps that may help us connect to our calming breath bringing us closer to a state of simple being. It is pointed out in this piece that there are “documented benefits of mindfulness meditation” which “can include better management of chronic pain, an increase in self-awareness, improved digestion and higher immune function.” It is understood that we all are busy with our jobs and personal lives. It is a good reminder, as the Zen proverb states, “You should sit in meditation for twenty minutes every day – unless you’re too busy. Then you should sit for hour.” Read on here for some potentially influential and uplifting guidance.

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General Interest: NASA Program Aims to Prepare Astronauts to Become Space Doctors

General Interest: NASA Program Aims to Prepare Astronauts to Become Space Doctors
Submitted by: Scott Winfield, The Ohio State University

NASA and Brigham and Women’s Hospital have teamed up to create a first-of-its-kind simulator to teach astronauts how to deal with medical emergencies. Watch the NBC Nightly News feature on YouTube here.

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Preparing For LGBTQ Health Issues as an SP Educator

Preparing For LGBTQ Health Issues as an SP Educator
By: Kris Slawinski, The University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine

Carrie Bonhert blazes our path to providing LGBTQ healthcare simulations with her ongoing work and presentations at ASPE and other medical education conferences.

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Research Article: An Easy-to-build, Low-budget Point-of-care Ultrasound Simulator - From Linux to a Web-based Solution

Research Article: An Easy-to-build, Low-budget Point-of-care Ultrasound Simulator - From Linux to a Web-based Solution
Lead Author: Domagoj Damjanovic
Submitted by: Kerensa Peterson, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

Finding a hands-on ultrasound simulator that is inexpensive and easy to access in any setting is a challenge for many medical schools.  There are computer-based programs that have been developed that are either affordable or accessible but combining these two principles has remained challenging – until now.  The authors of this study analyzed the usability of an HTML-based solution to this problem that they created based on the developers of the original EDUS2, Paul Kulyk and Paul Olszynski.  Take a look at this incredible innovation in the Critical Ultrasound Journal here.

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General Interest: Kathryn

General Interest: Kathryn
By: David Muller, MD
Submitted by: Dan Brown, Emory School of Medicine

Dr. Muller begins with a story of a fourth-year medical student that took her own life, and ends with a call to action at his own school, encouraging the same of others. He describes the relentless pressure faced by prospective and current students, and calls for a culture change. For us, as educators administering the tests that cause the learners some of the greatest stress of their academic careers, this can serve as a reminder of the fragile mental state they may be in.Read the full article in the New England Journal of Medicinehere.

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Podcasts: KeyLIME and Pomegranate Health Offer Podcasts in Medicine

Podcasts: KeyLIME and Pomegranate Health Offer Podcasts in Medicine
Submitted by: Todd Lash, Publications Committee Chair

If you have ever wished you had more time to read medical education articles or other resources but just can’t seem to find the time in your schedule, consider multitasking and listening to a podcast while you work. Two resources, Key Literature in Medical Education (KeyLIME) and Pomegranate Health offer podcasts that discuss the main points of a medical education article in just 20 minutes, or present stories about clinical decision-making, physician well-being or socio-ethical challenges in medicine, respectively. You can listen to podcasts directly from the website or you can subscribe on iTunes or other podcast streaming apps. Listen in for something different or a change of pace!

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Medical Education: “There’s a Person in There”

Medical Education: “There’s a Person in There”
By: Joe Burns
Submitted by: Todd Lash, Publications Committee Chair

The elderly female patient was a frequent visitor of the dermatology clinic.  Her physician had provided routine care for her, removing suspicious spots for decades.  Today she was presenting for an exacerbation of her psoriasis.  We entered the room and the patient was visibly distraught.  She was wearing a wrinkled t-shirt and old jeans, a stark contrast to her usual Southern Lilly Pulitzer dresses.  As we began taking her history, she broke down, bawling over her psoriasis. Read the full articleat Reflective MedEdhere.

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Podcast: How Standardized Patients Work

Podcast: How Standardized Patients Work
By: Josh Clark and Chuck Bryant, Stuff You Should Know
Submitted by: Anna Lank, C3NY

Even the most brilliant medical minds need a good bedside manner, and thanks to standardized patients, they can improve their skills. What are they? Part-time workers who pretend to be real patients so doctors can practice on live humans. If you're remembering Kramer on Seinfeld right about now, you're not alone.Listen to the podcast here.

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General Interest: Med Students Create App to Connect LGBTQ Patient, Inclusive Doctors

General Interest: Med Students Create App to Connect LGBTQ Patient, Inclusive Doctors
By: Rebecca Oh
Submitted by: Stephen Charles, Educational Resources Committee Chair

Three medical students at the University of Pennsylvania are getting ready launch their LGBTQ-focused health care app, SpectrumScores, by the end of August.The app will connect lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer patients with doctors who have been recognized as LGBTQ-friendly by advocacy organizations, academic medical centers and, eventually, the app users themselves.Read the full article on the NBC News website here.

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In the Age of Digital Medicine, the Humble Reflex Hammer Hangs On

In the Age of Digital Medicine, the Humble Reflex Hammer Hangs On
By: Bret Stetka
Submitted by: Bob Bolyard

Receiving a diagnosis in 2017 — at least one made at a medical center outfitted with the latest clinical gadgetry — might include a scan that divides your body into a bread loaf of high-resolution digital slices. Your DNA might be fed through a gene sequencer that spits out your mortal code in a matter of hours. Even your smartphone might soon be used to uncover health problems.Yet nearly 130 years since its inception — after decades of science has mapped out our neuronal pathways — a simple knob of rubber with a metal handle remains one of medicine's most essential tools. I'm referring to the cheap, portable, easy-to-use reflex hammer. Read the full NPR article here.

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