IMSH 2020 Plenary Speaker: Cary Lohrenz

Submitted by: Janice Radway, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

I had the good fortune to attend the 2020 International Meeting on Simulation in Healthcare conference in San Diego this past January. Not only did I enjoy beautiful San Diego and the warm weather, but I took in a variety of keynote speakers and a number of inspiring workshops and talks.

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Three Zones of Cultural Competency: Surface Competency, Bias Twilight, and the Confronting Midnight Zone

By: Tanisha Jowsey
Submitted by: Todd Lash, The Ohio State University

Regulatory authorities in healthcare are authorized to develop and assess the cultural competence of their professionals. There remains significant diversity on approaches to cultural competency training and assessment. Little evidence exists about whether existing cultural competency training leads to improved patient health outcomes and reductions in health disparity.

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Reliability of Scores Obtained from Standardized Patient and Instructor Assessments

Lead Author: Gulsen Tasdelen Teker
Submitted by: Kathy Herzberger, Loma Linda School of Medicine

We all know how hard it is to recruit instructors to participate in OSCE assessment. One alternative is to use standardized patients as raters. However, are they as reliable as instructors are? Although not a large study, I found the results very interesting.

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Three-Dimensional Needs of Standardized Patients in Nursing Simulations and Collaboration Strategies: A Qualitative Analysis

Lead Author: Hye-Rim Jin
Submitted by: Kerensa Peterson, NBOME Chicago

The authors of this study in Korea have asked what drives Standardized Patients to do great simulation work.  Their results give further explanation to studies that have been conducted since the 1990s, offering examples of how SPs find meaning in their work, are shown empathy for their work, and participate in the education process.

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Girl Scouts Teach Budding Doctors How to Communicate with Young Patients

Author: Mari A. Schaefer
Submitted by: Janice Radway, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Have you had difficulty finding pediatric patients for your SP programs? The Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine found a great collaboration in their local Girl Scouts troupe. These scouts were trained as SPs to give osteopathic students a chance to practice their interpersonal and communication skills with pediatric patients. The scouts also benefited from the experience, noted Renee Cree, spokesperson for the college. They learned what to ask of doctors when dealing with their own health.

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U.S. Medical Schools Boost LGBTQ Students, Doctor Training

By: Lindsey Tanner, AP News
Submitted by: Todd Lash, The Ohio State University

Aliya Feroe recalls the flustered OB-GYN who referred her to another physician after learning she identified as queer. For Rhi Ledgerwood, who was designated female at birth, identifies as trans and doesn’t have sex with men, it was a doctor advising about condoms and pregnancy prevention. For Tim Keyes, who came out as gay at age 17, it’s when doctors automatically assumed he sleeps with women. Ask any LGBTQ patient about awkward doctor visits and chances are they’ll have a story to tell.

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Are Rating Scales Really Better than Checklists for Measuring Increasing Levels of Expertise

Lead Author: Timothy Wood
Submitted by: Kathy Herzberger, Loma Linda School of Medicine

This is a very interesting article reexamining the relationship between increased training and scoring instruments on OSCE stations. This study explores whether checklists or global rating scales are better at evaluating increasing levels of expertise.

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In The Spotlight: California Baptist University

Submitted By: Sarah Pearce

Full Center Name: School of Nursing Interprofessional Education Learning Resource Center

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ASPE Standards of Best Practice Translated into Japanese

Lead Author: Keiko Abe, Aichi Medical University Collage of Nursing and Cathy Smith, Baycrest Health Sciences
Submitted by: Holly Gerzina,
Northeast Ohio Medical University 

The Association of Standardized Patient Educators (ASPE) Standards of Best Practice (SOBP), published in Advances in Simulation in 2017, represents an important milestone in the development of SP methodology and the professionalization of the practices of those who work with SPs. Designed to be used in conjunction with other simulation standards, such as those developed by INACSL, the ASPE SOBP focus on providing principles and practices that help ensure safety and effectiveness related to the work of all human role players involved in simulation. Currently, the SOBP have only been published in English. Although the SOBP are being implemented in many English speaking countries, there is a barrier related to putting the ASPE SOBP into practice in countries where English is not the first language. As ASPE’s mission is global the ASPE International Committee has initiated the translation of these standards into other languages. The Japanese version is available now on ASPE’s website. This initiative represents the first of many translations of ASPE SOBP into other languages to ensure that simulation practitioners around the world can benefit from using these standards.

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In The Spotlight: University of Portland

Submitted By: Jodi Blankenship

Full Center Name: University of Portland Simulated Health Center

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Parent-Provider Paediatric Literacy Communication: A Curriculum for Future Primary Care Providers

Lead Author: Tiffany Kindratt
Submitted by: Kerensa Peterson, NBOME Chicago

Scholarly literature has expanded on the benefits of literacy programs designed to get parents and children between the ages of 6 months to 5 years reading together. Many of those studies have shown that training in residency on programs like Reach Out and Read may improve knowledge, skills, and attitudes toward pediatric literacy. Previous studies, however, lacked simulation experiences in which learners can practice the communication skills necessary to engage with patients and caregivers.

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Effect of a Single-Session Communication Skills Training on Empathy in Medical Students

Lead Author: Cheryl D’souza
Submitted by: Catherine Hagele, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Empathy scores have been found to decline over the years spent in medical school. These authors aimed to evaluate the change in empathy levels in medical students following a single-session communications skills training. While levels initially went up, they then went down after a few weeks. A regular communications skills training program may enhance empathy and prevent its decline over the years.

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Medical Education Trends for Future Physicians in the Era of Advanced Technology and Artificial Intelligence: An Integrative Review

Lead Author: Eui-Ryoung Han
Submitted by: Kathy Herzberger, Loma Linda School of Medicine

Medical education must adapt to different health care contexts, including digitalized health care systems and a digital generation of students in a hyper-connected world. The aims of this study are to identify and synthesize the values that medical educators need to implement in the curricula and to introduce representative educational programs.

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Saving the Family Physician One Doctor at a Time through ‘Lifestyle Medicine’

Author: Melissa Chefec
Submitted by: Janice Radway, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Physician burnout, especially among family doctors who often labor long hours with little support, is a major problem in the United Sates, contributing to a growing nationwide shortage of practitioners. Bethlehem, Pennsylvania-based St. Luke’s University Health Network has launched an innovative residency program to stop burn-out before it happens. The new program promotes “lifestyle medicine” not only for patients, but also for doctors themselves.

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How to Define Core Entrustable Professional Activities for Entry into Residency?

Lead Author: Ylva Holzhausen
Submitted by: Mary Launder, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science

The definition of core Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs) for entry into postgraduate training has become an active field of development. Many institutions are currently considering the use of EPAs as outcomes for their undergraduate medical programs. These institutions can build in part on EPAs which have been reported at a national level and at a local level, but will be required to undertake their own content validation process to adapt these EPAs to their specific context. However, available reports do not include a fully detailed description of the EPA development process which could guide other institutions. In this article, we report in detail on a systematic, literature-based approach we employed to define core EPAs for entry into residency as outcomes for the undergraduate medical curriculum at Charité - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Germany.

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Your Professional Decline is Coming Sooner Than You Think

Author: Arthur C. Brooks
Submitted by: Dan Brown, Emory University

This article is relevant to any creative professionals; to anyone who finds their value in the quality of their work.

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Development of an Empathy and Clarity Rating Scale to Measure the Effect of Medical Improv on End-of-First-Year OCSE Performance: A Pilot Study

Lead Author: Carol A. Terreginoa,
Submitted by: Michael Maury, UC-San Diego

Patients want empathetic physicians who listen and understand. How do you teach and measure empathy? The objective of this study was “To develop a framework and instrument, the Empathy and Clarity Rating Scale (ECRS), for measuring communication elements used by actors and physicians, and pilot ECRS to test effectiveness of medical improv on first-year students’ communication skills.” Four medical schools collaborated. USMLE Step 2 Communication and Interpersonal Skills (CIS) domains were used as framework for discussion among three focus groups, each with clinicians, actors, communication experts, and community members with patient experience. Audiotaped discussions were transcribed; open coding procedures located emerging themes. Final ECRS was used to study student performance across three levels of experience with medical improv. What was developed from this pilot study was “a communication scale enlightened by experiences of actors, clinicians, scholars and patients.”

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Patients with Empathetic Doctors are at Reduced Risk of Early Death

Author: Kelly Earley
Submitted by: Catherine Hagele, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Patients reporting better experiences of empathy in the first 12 months after diagnosis have a significantly lower risk of death over the subsequent 10 years, compared to those who experienced low practitioner empathy.

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Evaluating Cultural Competence in Undergraduate Nursing Students Using Standardized Patients

Author: Deborah Byrne, PhD, RN, CNE
Submitted by: Marsha Harman, Rush University

The need for culturally competent health-care providers is essential in reducing health disparities and ensuring positive patient outcomes. The use of simulation with standardized patients (SPs) is an effective strategy that could be integrated throughout undergraduate nursing curricula to evaluate a student’s cultural competence.

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How to Identify, Address and Report Students’ Unprofessional Behaviour in Medical School

Lead Author: Marianne Mak-van der Vossen
Submitted by: Kathy Herzberger, Loma Linda School of Medicine

This AMEE guide provides a research overview of the identification of, and responding to unprofessional behaviour in medical students. It is directed towards medical educators in preclinical and clinical undergraduate medical education. It aims to describe, clarify and categorize different types of unprofessional behaviours, highlighting students’ unprofessional behaviour profiles and what they mean for further guidance. This facilitates identification, addressing, reporting and remediation of different types of unprofessional behaviour.

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