Congratulations: Peggy Wallace - One of the Pillars of the SP Educator Profession – Is Retiring

Congratulations: Peggy Wallace - One of the Pillars of the SP Educator Profession – Is Retiring
By: Rob MacAulay
Submitted by: Michael Maury, UCSD School of Medicine

One of the pillars of the standardized patient (SP) educator profession is retiring September 28, 2018. Please join all of us at UC San Diego as we wish Dr. Peggy Wallace all the best in her new adventures.

Read More

Conference: Dr. Kim Edward LeBlanc’s Plenary Address to ASPE: Do We Need Clinical Skills Assessment?

Conference: Dr. Kim Edward LeBlanc’s Plenary Address to ASPE: Do We Need Clinical Skills Assessment?
By: Michael Maury, UC-San Diego

Tuesday’s ASPE plenary address was delivered by Dr. Kim Edward LeBlanc. Dr. LeBlanc is the Executive Director of the Clinical Skills Evaluation Collaboration (CSEC). CSEC creates and administers the USMLE Step 2 Clinical Skills Examination. He is a family physician with a certification in Sports Medicine, previously served on the Louisiana State Board of Medical Examiners for nearly 14 years, and was Professor and Head of the Department of Family Medicine at the LSUHSC School of Medicine in New Orleans for 11 years.

Read More

Conference: Dr. David Zamierowski’s Plenary Address to ASP: Cybernetics and Empathy

Conference: Dr. David Zamierowski’s Plenary Address to ASP: Cybernetics and Empathy
By Kerensa Peterson, Northwestern University

Dr. David S. Zamierowski delivered the opening plenary session to an eager group of ASPE Annual Conference attendees on Sunday, June 17th in Kansas City, MO.  He began his lecture by walking the audience through a brief history of cybernetics.

Read More

Conference: Dr. Jo Brown’s Plenary Address to ASPE: Putting Simulation in an Educational Context – Some Fresh Insights

Conference: Dr. Jo Brown’s Plenary Address to ASPE: Putting Simulation in an Educational Context – Some Fresh Insights
By: Dan Brown, Emory University School of Medicine

Monday morning at ASPE began with a plenary address from Dr. Jo Brown, Head of Quality in Teaching and Learning at Bart’s and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, titled Putting Simulation in an Educational Context – Some Fresh Insights. Dr. Brown began with a caveat: “You may not agree with everything I say.” She paused, then added “Good.”

Read More

Poster Winners: 2018 ASPE Conference

Poster Winners: 2018 ASPE Conference
Compiled by: Todd Lash, Publication Committee Chair

Each year eligible posters are judged using criteria based on Glassick criteria for scholarship (Glassick CE et al, San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, 1997) and first-place and honorable mention prizes are awarded. Details regarding the winning posters, as provided along with all poster submissions on the conference website, follow below. Congratulations to the winners!

Read More

Special Interest Groups: The Value of Reviewing Best Practices in GTA/MUTA Programs

Special Interest Groups: The Value of Reviewing Best Practices in GTA/MUTA Programs
By: Kerensa Peterson, Northwestern University

At the year’s ASPE Conference, I had the opportunity to attend the pre-conference workshop, “Create and Manage a GTA/MUTA Program and Train Instructors Using the ASPE Standards of Best Practice.” The presenters – Holly Hopkins, Molly Chasion, Richard Claflin, John Darrow, Jennifer Murphy, Chelsea Smith, Tim Webster and Rose Zaeske – used the World Café model for small group discussions. These discussions focused on using the ASPE Standards of Best Practice (SOBP) to further define, strengthen and develop GTA (Gynecological Teaching Associate) and MUTA (Male Urological Teaching Associate) practices.

Read More

Article: Meet the Robot Helping to Save Real Lives

Article: Meet the Robot Helping to Save Real Lives
By: Nushrat Rahman
Submitted By: Michael Maury, UC-San Diego

In this article, the author, Nushrat Rahman, writes of the rapidly evolving technology of simulation mannequins and their positive effect on medical education. Rahman writes about Dr. Craig Reickert, director of the center and division of Colon and Rectal Surgery at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit who notes, “Whether via mannequins or standardized patients participants can be more emotionally invested and mentally active during simulation exercises.” The author goes on to write, “With real-time feedback from monitors and patients, they’re more capable of recognizing the gravity of situations and responding accordingly. This realism allows content to “stick” better for adult learners, and when it does, it means better care for actual patients with authentic symptoms.” As SP Educators, we understand the importance of giving learners a situation in which they can safely fail and make mistakes which lead to understanding.

Read More

Media Article: The Art and Science of Patient Safety

Media Article: The Art and Science of Patient Safety
By: Maya Bell
Submitted by: Todd Lash, Publications Committee Chair

Wearing an oxygen mask and neck brace, the teenager is conscious but confused when he arrives in the ER with a paramedic who advises he fell down stairs after swallowing an unknown quantity of antidepressants, opioids, and alcohol in an attempted suicide. “Help me, please help me,” moans the 17-year-old named Oscar. “Where am I? Why is everything so blurry? Am I wearing 3D glasses?”

Read More

Research Article: Standardized Patients in Psychiatry – the Best Way to Learn Clinical Skills?

Research Article:  Standardized Patients in Psychiatry – the Best Way to Learn Clinical Skills?
Lead author:  Monika Himmelbauer
Submitted by:  Dyan Colpo, Cleveland Clinic

At the Medical University of Vienna, SPs portray four different patient roles in psychiatry depicting depression/suicidal tendencies, somatoform disorder, anxiety disorder, or borderline disorder. Instructor and SP give constructive feedback to the student afterwards. The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of the SP’s roleplay and feedback. Students and teachers evaluated SPs’ performance and feedback very well; however, the SP’s quality of roleplaying was evaluated as the poorest while playing the psychiatric disorder “depression/suicidal tendencies.”

Read More

Original Content: Diversity Hiring – What We Can Learn from the NFL

Original Content: Diversity Hiring – What We Can Learn from the NFL
By Dan Brown
Emory University School of Medicine

At an open forum at the ASPE conference in Kansas City the topic of diversity among ASPE membership arose. While there was some difference of opinion on whether we’re diversifying enough over time, there was general agreement that the membership would like to see more diversity. This discussion got me thinking about the National Football League’s famous “Rooney Rule,” and how it applies to our work. The main question ASPE and the NFL have in common is:

Read More

Research Article: A Prenatal Standardized Patient Experience for Medical Students on Their Family Medicine Clerkship

Research Article: A Prenatal Standardized Patient Experience for Medical Students on Their Family Medicine Clerkship
Lead author: Sarah E. Stumbar
Submitted by: Janice Radway, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Students on their family medicine clerkship at Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine were getting little clinical exposure to obstetric care, which is not commonly provided by family physicians in urban settings. To address this, the program added a 2-hour SP session to their didactic curriculum. The SP was collectively interviewed by the student group during four simulated prenatal visits, each of which presented a different complication of pregnancy. Data from this study suggests that this session increased students’ self-confidence with obstetrics management, filled in gaps in their clinical exposure to full-spectrum family medicine, and addressed a perceived learning need.

Read More

General Interest: Improving Communication Among Surgeons

General Interest: Improving Communication Among Surgeons
By: Geri Kelley
Submitted by: Michael Maury, UCSD School of Medicine

Michigan State University researcher Cheryl Anderson has found a better way for veteran surgeons to provide feedback to their aspiring surgeon counterparts during their residencies. In a new study, Anderson, director of quality improvement and surgical education in the College of Human Medicine, shows that formative feedback and the communication between teacher and student improved under a more-structured process using proven educational models. Formative feedback is input that helps students identify strengths and weaknesses, as well as focus on areas that need work.

Read More

General Interest: ASPE eNews Blog Passes 50000 Click Milestone

General Interest: ASPE eNews Blog Passes 50000 Click Milestone
By: Todd Lash, Publications Committee Chair

The ASPE eNews Blog launched on May 22, 2017, and in July 2018 surpassed the 50,000 click milestone. As of July 18, 2018, 126 articles had been published on the blog, and the total number of times readers had clicked on those entries was 54,966. Among those 126 entries, more than half (66) have been viewed more than 400 times! While we do not know if that number translates explicitly to 400 readers, since a single reader who views the same article repeatedly would count as multiple clicks, it stands to reason that we have a significant number of readers who are visiting the blog. Among the top 20 entries with the most views, the most popular content categories are entries about ASPE and its affiliates (8) and Research Articles (5). The all-time most popular entry, with 1765 views, is an essay written by an SP. The top 20 entries with the most views, with licks to the top 5, are listed below:

Read More

Resource: Simulation in Child Welfare Training: Moving Beyond Role Play

Resource: Simulation in Child Welfare Training: Moving Beyond Role Play
By: Capacity Building Center for States
Submitted by: Amber Snyder, University of Pittsburgh

Simulation training for child welfare workers can assist in developing the necessary skills and approaches needed to gain positive outcomes for children and families supported in child welfare. Simulation trainings in child welfare can be designed to mimic real life situations, while providing learners a safe space to expand their skills.

Read More

Original Article: Values and Value in Simulated Participant Methodology: A Global Perspective on Contemporary Practices

Original Article: Values and Value in Simulated Participant Methodology: A Global Perspective on Contemporary Practices
Lead author: Debra Nestel, Melbourne Medical School
Submitted by: Valerie Fulmer, ASPE President

Abstract: This article has been written for the 40th year of the publication of Medical Teacher. While we celebrate the contribution of simulated participants (SPs) to health professions education through values and value-based learning, we also offer critical reflection on elements of our practice, commencing with language. We argue for the use of the term simulated rather than standardized and acknowledge the dominant role of the SP as patient and the origins of the methodology. These shifts in terms and their implications in practice reflect changes in the conceptualization of SP-based methodology. Recently published standards for those who work with SPs (SP practitioners) are noted as an important milestone in our community’s development. We consider contemporary practices addressing the complex notions of values and value in SP-based learning. We simultaneously refer to the work of SPs and SP practitioners. Phases of educational design including identifying learning objectives, scenario design, implementation, feedback and debriefing are used to illustrate methodological shifts. Within each of these phases, there are relational issues that have to date often gone unchecked and are under reported in literature. Finally, using the metaphor of a murmuration, we celebrate contemporary practices of the global SP practitioner community.

Read More

Research Article: Standardized Patients in Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy: a Scoping Review of Barriers and Facilitators for Implementation

Research Article: Standardized Patients in Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy: a Scoping Review of Barriers and Facilitators for Implementation
Lead author: Franziska Kühne
Submitted by: Jackson Szeto, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Use of standardized patients is an emerging discipline in the field of psychology and psychotherapy. Through filters using content-analysis techniques, the authors have included 41 publications relevant to use of standardized patients in clinical psychology and psychotherapy. This review system considers barriers and facilitators used to consider implementation of SP interventions in this field. Through various literature searches, these barriers and facilitators were categorized and authors were able to display a variety of recommendations for implementing Standardized Patient programs.

Read More

Todd Lash Receives Emerging Leader Award

Todd Lash Receives Emerging Leader Award
Submitted by: Janice Radway, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

In recognition of the outstanding talent within the Association of Standardized Patient Educators, we annually honor an individual who has worked with human simulation methodology for fewer than seven years with the “Emerging Leader of the Year Award.”

Read More

Diane Ferguson Receives Outstanding Educator of the Year Award

Diane Ferguson Receives Outstanding Educator of the Year Award
Submitted by: Jennie Strujik, University of Washington

In recognition of the outstanding talent within the Association of Standardized Patient Educators, we annually honor an individual ASPE member through the “Outstanding SP Educator Award.”

Read More
1 Comments

Research Article: Medical Education and Human Trafficking: Using Simulation

Research Article: Medical Education and Human Trafficking: Using Simulation
Lead Author: Hanni Stoklosa
Submitted by: Janice Radway and Michael Maury

At the 2016 ASPE conference, I was privileged to view Carrie Bohnert’s snapshot presentation on the University of Louisville’s human trafficking education module using SPs. Bohnert and her co-authors have published their research outlining the development of their SBME (Simulation Based Medical Education) curriculum to prepare third year medical students to recognize trafficking victims and intervene on their behalf. Read about this fascinating and much-needed program in Medical Education Online here.

Read More

Podcast: Breaking Bad News

Podcast: Breaking Bad News
Submitted by: Kerensa Peterson, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

As some healthcare providers move away from utilizing the SPIKES mnemonic for delivering bad news, now is the time for reflection on this framework, its originator and the circumstances that led to the development of this communication model. Dr. Rob Buckman lived a fascinating life. The combination of working as a comedian and oncologist at a time when American physicians were ending the practice of not disclosing a cancer diagnosis to their patients clearly influenced Dr. Buckman's work. Even though other frameworks, like the COMFORT model, are beginning to overtake his SPIKES model, one must recognize the rich history behind his methodology along with his empathy and charisma.

Read More