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General Interest: Medical Jargon May Cloud Doctor-patient Communication

General Interest: Medical Jargon May Cloud Doctor-patient Communication
By: Mary Gillis
Submitted by: Michael Maury, UCSD School of Medicine

As Standardized Patient Educators, we understand the importance of clear communication. We encourage our students to use very little jargon or at least follow up any jargon with a clear explanation as to mitigate misunderstanding and confusion. In this article, Mary Gillis discusses a recent “survey of London oral and maxillofacial surgery clinic patients” where “more than a third of participants did not know the meaning of terms like ‘benign’ or ‘lesion’ and more than half could not define ‘metastasis’ or ‘lymph node’.” According to UK researchers, Gillis states, “when patients misunderstand commonly used medical terms, communication and decision-making may suffer.” Read the full article on Reuters Health News here.

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Media Article: Searching for the Roots of Empathy in Rituals of Care

Media Article: Searching for the Roots of Empathy in Rituals of Care
By: Emily Wilson
Submitted by: Valerie Fulmer, ASPE President

Kerry Tribe is interested in memory, language and awkward connections. These come together in her latest project, Standardized Patient. These SPs (as Tribe calls them) are professional actors used to train future doctors how to listen, be empathetic, and establish a rapport with patients. After observing classes at Stanford University and the University of Southern California, Tribe came up with four case scenarios, and she’s made a two-channel video installation, on display in San Francisco Museum of Modern Art’s New Work series through February 25 — her first solo exhibition at a major U.S. museum. Read the full article at Hyperallergic.com here.

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International News: China’s First International SP forum held in Hangzhou

International News: China’s First International SP forum held in Hangzhou
Submitted by: Robert MacAulay, Director, Standardized Patient Program UCSD School of Medicine

In December 2017 China held its first international simulated patient forum in the city of Hangzhou hosted by the China SP Practice Teaching Guidance Committee (CSPC) and sponsored by Zhejiang University. ASPE was graciously invited to attend the forum as a guest of the CSPC and introduced its Standards of Best Practice to a receptive group of attendees representing eight countries. Twenty speakers presented over the two day forum including ASPE members David Li, Robert MacAulay, Debra Nestel, Carol Pfeiffer, Claudia Schlegel and Peggy Wallace. The theme of the forum was: communication, cooperation, innovation, development and pragmatism.

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Media Article: Back to Pharmacy School, Part 1 - What's Being Taught Now?

Media Article: Back to Pharmacy School, Part 1 - What's Being Taught Now?
By: Karen Berger, PharmD
Submitted by: Lee Ann Miller, SP Educator, WV STEPS

The WVU School of Pharmacy is an exemplary entity at the David and JoAnn Shaw Center for Simulation Training and Education for Patient Safety (STEPS), the simulation center for all of WVU Health Sciences.  As this practicing pharmacist will attest, students today reap wide benefits from the learning experiences afforded to them by the forward thinking faculty of our institution. Simulation and interprofessional activity are paramount. We are proud to support student centered learning and the “flipped” classroom, by providing educational experiences with dozens of Standardized Patients, GTAs, and MUTAs. WV STEPS was recently mentioned in an article at Pharmacy Times, which can be read here.

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Research Article: Performance of International Medical Students In Psychosocial Medicine

Research Article: Performance of International Medical Students In Psychosocial Medicine
Lead Author: Daniel Huhn
Submitted by: Janice Radway, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Research shows that international students perform poorer than their local counterparts in written and oral examinations as well as in Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) in the fields of internal medicine and surgery. This 2017 study, which took place at the Medical Faculty of Heidelberg, Germany, is the first to examine how they compare in a psychosocial medicine OSCE. While there were no differences in their factual and practical knowledge, there were significant differences in conversational skills, on which the field relies heavily. Read the full article in the BMC Medical Education here.

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General Interest: Data Visualization in Medical Communication

General Interest: Data Visualization in Medical Communication
Source: 90TEN Healthcare
Submitted by: Michael Maury, UCSD School of Medicine

In the increasingly data-rich but time-poor environment of clinical practice, doctors face the escalating challenge of maintaining up-to-date clinical knowledge. By 2020, it is estimated that medical knowledge will be doubling every 73 days. How can medical communications help to meet this challenge and ensure that the content delivered is in a clear and understandable format, and can be assimilated quickly? One solution is data visualization. Read the full article at PMLiVE here.

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Essay: My Real Patients

Essay: My Real Patients
By: Lisa Simon, D.M.D.
Submitted by: Janice Radway, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

In this essay, medical student Lisa Simon compares her interactions with standardized patients in a clinical exam to her work as a dentist in a local jail. She describes how both encounters are watched by an outside eye (whether by video camera or security guard) and how that observation affects the interaction. She expresses her desire to receive the same authentic feedback from her “real patients” as she receives from her SPs. Read the full essay in the New England Journal of Medicine here.

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General Interest: New Cell Phone App Improves Patient Experience and Drives Growth

General Interest: New Cell Phone App Improves Patient Experience and Drives Growth
Source: The Holvan Group
Submitted by: Michael Maury, UCSD School of Medicine

“The Holvan Group, a technology company focused on improving the patient experience and easing the burden placed on physicians, today announced the launch of two apps that complement the company's educational videos and expand patient engagement. The Holvan Group's proprietary technologies streamline the patient preparation process and improve the interaction between patients and healthcare providers.” Technology is continually expanding and being utilized in the world of medicine. We as SP Educators must be diligent in keeping up with these changes and incorporating them into our curriculums and teachings. Read for more information that may spark new ideas to incorporate into your program. Read the full article at Cleveland 19 News here.

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Research Article: Impact of Standardized Simulated Patients on First-Year Pharmacy Students’ Knowledge Retention of Insulin Injection Technique and Counseling Skills

Research Article: Impact of Standardized Simulated Patients on First-Year Pharmacy Students’ Knowledge Retention of Insulin Injection Technique and Counseling Skills
Lead author: Riley Bowers, PharmD
Submitted by: Robert MacAulay, Director, Standardized Patient Program UCSD School of Medicine

Objective. To compare pre- and post-intervention test scores assessing insulin injection technique and counseling skills among P1 students with (intervention) or without (control) simulated patients, and to compare counseling checklist and knowledge retention test scores between groups.

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General Interest: Future Physician, Heal Thyself – Get Thee to a Gallery

General Interest: Future Physician, Heal Thyself – Get Thee to a Gallery
By: Tom Jacobs
Submitted by: Valerie Fulmer, ASPE President

Envision a new generation of doctors who are more compassionate toward their patients, less prone to jumping to conclusions, and less likely to feel burned out. Then imagine such characteristics could be cultivated by tweaking the physician-training program. Sound good? Well, new research suggests such a shift is entirely possible. The key is exposing our future MDs to the arts. Read the full article at Pacific Standard here.

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Media Article: Standardized Patients and the Art of Medical Maladies

Media Article: Standardized Patients and the Art of Medical Maladies
By: David Owens
Submitted by: Anna Lank, Managing Director C3NY

Natalie Wilder was sitting on a couch in a greenroom, using her iPhone to apply for a part in a film. Back in June, she starred in a one-woman play, “Fresh Hell: The Life and Loves of Dorothy Parker,” at the Oldcastle Theatre Company, in Bennington, Vermont. In an hour, she was going to reprise a different solo role, one of dozens she’s performed multiple times in recent years. “Today, I have lower-back pain,” she said, as she scrolled through her calendar. Read the full article in The New Yorker here.

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Member Submissions: Life Hacks for the SP Educator

Member Submissions: Life Hacks for the SP Educator
By: Dan Brown, Emory School of Medicine, with contributions from ASPE membership

Occasionally members the ASPE Publications Committee will crowdsource content using the ASPE listserv. Keep an eye on listserv emails for opportunities to contribute! For more information on the listserv, click here.

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General Interest: Alan Alda Shares Communication Wisdom at Cooper Medical School of Rowan University

General Interest: Alan Alda Shares Communication Wisdom at Cooper Medical School of Rowan University
Submitted by: Janice Radway, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Actor Alan Alda (of M*A*S*H fame) recently spoke to the students and faculty of Cooper Medical School of Rowan University during “The Patient Will See You Now,” a special grand rounds lecture held at the school. During the past several years, Alda has been helping scientists learn to communicate more clearly with the public through his work with Stony Brook University School of Journalism’s Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science. While Alda did not specifically discuss the use of SPs, we educators know what a valuable tool SPs provide for building empathy and communication skills. Alda’s staff held workshops designed to help healthcare providers hone their communication skills with interprofessional teams as well as patients, often using improvisational theater exercises. Read the full article in Rowan Today here.

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Research Article: The Effects of Using High-fidelity Simulators and Standardized Patients on the Thorax, Lung, and Cardiac Examination Skills of Undergraduate Nursing Students

Research Article: The Effects of Using High-fidelity Simulators and Standardized Patients on the Thorax, Lung, and Cardiac Examination Skills of Undergraduate Nursing Students
Lead author: Hilal Tuzer
Submitted by: Michael Maury, UCSD School of Medicine

Are standardized patients more effective than high-fidelity simulators in training thorax-lungs and cardiac examinations? This research article describes a study in which fifty-two 4th year nursing students took part in an exercise that compared the effects of each type of training. Read the full article in Nurse Education Today here.

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Research Article: Physical Examination Skills Training: Faculty Staff vs. Patient Instructor Feedback—A Controlled Trial

Research Article: Physical Examination Skills Training: Faculty Staff vs. Patient Instructor Feedback—A Controlled Trial
Lead author: Markus Krautter
Submitted by: Todd Lash, Publications Committee Chair

Krautter et al conducted a randomized controlled study comparing feedback of PIs and faculty staff following a physical examination assessed by students and video assessors. Standardized patients acting at Patient instructors (PIs) and faculty staff physicians separately delivered feedback to 40 medical students that had performed a physical examination on the respective PI while the physicians observed the performance. The physical examination was rated by two independent video assessors to provide an objective performance standard. Feedback of PI and physicians was content analyzed by two different independent video assessors based on a provided checklist and compared to the performance standard. There was no statistical significant difference concerning overall matching of physician or PI feedback. The study demonstrates that trained PIs are able to provide feedback of equal quantitative value to that of faculty staff physicians with regard to a physical examination performed on them. However, both the students and the video raters judged the quality of the feedback given by the physicians to be significantly better than that of the PIs. Read the full article in PLoS One here.

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Affiliate News: Society For Simulation in Healthcare Names Board Members

Affiliate News: Society For Simulation in Healthcare Names Board Members
Submitted by: Valerie Fulmer, ASPE President

WASHINGTON, D.C. January 20, 2018: The Society for Simulation in Healthcare (SSH) announced today its 2018 board of directors. Read the full release at PRWEB here.

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General Interest: ‘What did the doctor say?’ - A Simple Question with a Difficult Answer

General Interest: ‘What did the doctor say?’ - A Simple Question with a Difficult Answer
By: Richard Klasco and Lewis H. Glinert, The Washington Post
Submitted by: Ken Conselyea, , SP Ohio State University

Few simple questions are as difficult to answer as the perennial “What did the doctor say?” The words are so natural as to be virtually automatic. They spring from our lips, almost of their own accord, whenever a loved one returns from a doctor’s visit. Whether we recognize it or not, the answer has the potential to make us face our own mortality. Read the full article in The Washington Post here.

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Research Article: Teaching Medical Students to Express Empathy by Exploring Patient Emotions and Experiences in Standardized Medical Encounters

Research Article: Teaching Medical Students to Express Empathy by Exploring Patient Emotions and Experiences in Standardized Medical Encounters
Lead author: Roger Ruiz-Moral
Submitted by: Janice Radway, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

This study, conducted at Universidad Francisco de Vitoria in Madrid, Spain, looks at how well third-year medical students pick up on patients’ non-verbal and contextual clues as an opportunity to express empathy. The students attended a didactic and then had two SP encounters. SPs were scripted to give “tracking clues” based on how the students responded. This training program was largely successful in teaching students to carry out a deeper exploration of patients’ beliefs, fears and expectations, and thus express more empathetic statements to the patients. Read the full article in Patient Education and Counseling here.

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General Interest: The word is out! ASPE Standards of Best Practice publication receives praise from Advances in Simulation Journal

General Interest: The word is out! ASPE Standards of Best Practice publication receives praise from Advances in Simulation Journal
By: Valerie Fulmer, ASPE President

Many of you know of our recent Standards of Best Practice (SOBP) publication in the international journal Advances in Simulation. These standards establish a baseline for best practice in SP methodology essential to this new field and all programs working with SPs. A living document, the SOBP will continue to blossom and grow to serve this community of SP educators and others around the world.

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Media Article: Comparing Physical Exam Education at U.S. Medical Schools

Media Article: Comparing Physical Exam Education at U.S. Medical Schools
By: Anna Williams
Submitted by: Valerie Fulmer, ASPE President

The resources used to teach the physical exam to pre-clerkship medical students vary widely across U.S. medical schools, according to a new study published in the journal Academic Medicine. Toshiko Uchida, MD, director of Clinical Skills Education, was the first author of the study. “The physical exam is a crucial skill for physicians, and several studies suggest that poor physical exam skills can lead to lower-quality care and medical errors,” said Uchida, also an associate professor of Medical Education and of Medicine in the Division of General Internal Medicine and Geriatrics. “But every medical school curriculum is unique, and very little is actually known about how medical schools teach the physical exam.” Read the media article in the Northwestern Medicine News Center here, or read the research article in the Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges here.

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