BLOG

Original Content: Diversity Hiring – What We Can Learn from the NFL

Original Content: Diversity Hiring – What We Can Learn from the NFL
By Dan Brown
Emory University School of Medicine

At an open forum at the ASPE conference in Kansas City the topic of diversity among ASPE membership arose. While there was some difference of opinion on whether we’re diversifying enough over time, there was general agreement that the membership would like to see more diversity. This discussion got me thinking about the National Football League’s famous “Rooney Rule,” and how it applies to our work. The main question ASPE and the NFL have in common is:

Read More

Research Article: A Prenatal Standardized Patient Experience for Medical Students on Their Family Medicine Clerkship

Research Article: A Prenatal Standardized Patient Experience for Medical Students on Their Family Medicine Clerkship
Lead author: Sarah E. Stumbar
Submitted by: Janice Radway, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Students on their family medicine clerkship at Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine were getting little clinical exposure to obstetric care, which is not commonly provided by family physicians in urban settings. To address this, the program added a 2-hour SP session to their didactic curriculum. The SP was collectively interviewed by the student group during four simulated prenatal visits, each of which presented a different complication of pregnancy. Data from this study suggests that this session increased students’ self-confidence with obstetrics management, filled in gaps in their clinical exposure to full-spectrum family medicine, and addressed a perceived learning need.

Read More

General Interest: Improving Communication Among Surgeons

General Interest: Improving Communication Among Surgeons
By: Geri Kelley
Submitted by: Michael Maury, UCSD School of Medicine

Michigan State University researcher Cheryl Anderson has found a better way for veteran surgeons to provide feedback to their aspiring surgeon counterparts during their residencies. In a new study, Anderson, director of quality improvement and surgical education in the College of Human Medicine, shows that formative feedback and the communication between teacher and student improved under a more-structured process using proven educational models. Formative feedback is input that helps students identify strengths and weaknesses, as well as focus on areas that need work.

Read More

General Interest: ASPE eNews Blog Passes 50000 Click Milestone

General Interest: ASPE eNews Blog Passes 50000 Click Milestone
By: Todd Lash, Publications Committee Chair

The ASPE eNews Blog launched on May 22, 2017, and in July 2018 surpassed the 50,000 click milestone. As of July 18, 2018, 126 articles had been published on the blog, and the total number of times readers had clicked on those entries was 54,966. Among those 126 entries, more than half (66) have been viewed more than 400 times! While we do not know if that number translates explicitly to 400 readers, since a single reader who views the same article repeatedly would count as multiple clicks, it stands to reason that we have a significant number of readers who are visiting the blog. Among the top 20 entries with the most views, the most popular content categories are entries about ASPE and its affiliates (8) and Research Articles (5). The all-time most popular entry, with 1765 views, is an essay written by an SP. The top 20 entries with the most views, with licks to the top 5, are listed below:

Read More

Resource: Simulation in Child Welfare Training: Moving Beyond Role Play

Resource: Simulation in Child Welfare Training: Moving Beyond Role Play
By: Capacity Building Center for States
Submitted by: Amber Snyder, University of Pittsburgh

Simulation training for child welfare workers can assist in developing the necessary skills and approaches needed to gain positive outcomes for children and families supported in child welfare. Simulation trainings in child welfare can be designed to mimic real life situations, while providing learners a safe space to expand their skills.

Read More

Original Article: Values and Value in Simulated Participant Methodology: A Global Perspective on Contemporary Practices

Original Article: Values and Value in Simulated Participant Methodology: A Global Perspective on Contemporary Practices
Lead author: Debra Nestel, Melbourne Medical School
Submitted by: Valerie Fulmer, ASPE President

Abstract: This article has been written for the 40th year of the publication of Medical Teacher. While we celebrate the contribution of simulated participants (SPs) to health professions education through values and value-based learning, we also offer critical reflection on elements of our practice, commencing with language. We argue for the use of the term simulated rather than standardized and acknowledge the dominant role of the SP as patient and the origins of the methodology. These shifts in terms and their implications in practice reflect changes in the conceptualization of SP-based methodology. Recently published standards for those who work with SPs (SP practitioners) are noted as an important milestone in our community’s development. We consider contemporary practices addressing the complex notions of values and value in SP-based learning. We simultaneously refer to the work of SPs and SP practitioners. Phases of educational design including identifying learning objectives, scenario design, implementation, feedback and debriefing are used to illustrate methodological shifts. Within each of these phases, there are relational issues that have to date often gone unchecked and are under reported in literature. Finally, using the metaphor of a murmuration, we celebrate contemporary practices of the global SP practitioner community.

Read More

Research Article: Standardized Patients in Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy: a Scoping Review of Barriers and Facilitators for Implementation

Research Article: Standardized Patients in Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy: a Scoping Review of Barriers and Facilitators for Implementation
Lead author: Franziska Kühne
Submitted by: Jackson Szeto, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Use of standardized patients is an emerging discipline in the field of psychology and psychotherapy. Through filters using content-analysis techniques, the authors have included 41 publications relevant to use of standardized patients in clinical psychology and psychotherapy. This review system considers barriers and facilitators used to consider implementation of SP interventions in this field. Through various literature searches, these barriers and facilitators were categorized and authors were able to display a variety of recommendations for implementing Standardized Patient programs.

Read More

Todd Lash Receives Emerging Leader Award

Todd Lash Receives Emerging Leader Award
Submitted by: Janice Radway, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

In recognition of the outstanding talent within the Association of Standardized Patient Educators, we annually honor an individual who has worked with human simulation methodology for fewer than seven years with the “Emerging Leader of the Year Award.”

Read More

Diane Ferguson Receives Outstanding Educator of the Year Award

Diane Ferguson Receives Outstanding Educator of the Year Award
Submitted by: Jennie Strujik, University of Washington

In recognition of the outstanding talent within the Association of Standardized Patient Educators, we annually honor an individual ASPE member through the “Outstanding SP Educator Award.”

Read More
1 Comments

Research Article: Medical Education and Human Trafficking: Using Simulation

Research Article: Medical Education and Human Trafficking: Using Simulation
Lead Author: Hanni Stoklosa
Submitted by: Janice Radway and Michael Maury

At the 2016 ASPE conference, I was privileged to view Carrie Bohnert’s snapshot presentation on the University of Louisville’s human trafficking education module using SPs. Bohnert and her co-authors have published their research outlining the development of their SBME (Simulation Based Medical Education) curriculum to prepare third year medical students to recognize trafficking victims and intervene on their behalf. Read about this fascinating and much-needed program in Medical Education Online here.

Read More

Podcast: Breaking Bad News

Podcast: Breaking Bad News
Submitted by: Kerensa Peterson, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

As some healthcare providers move away from utilizing the SPIKES mnemonic for delivering bad news, now is the time for reflection on this framework, its originator and the circumstances that led to the development of this communication model. Dr. Rob Buckman lived a fascinating life. The combination of working as a comedian and oncologist at a time when American physicians were ending the practice of not disclosing a cancer diagnosis to their patients clearly influenced Dr. Buckman's work. Even though other frameworks, like the COMFORT model, are beginning to overtake his SPIKES model, one must recognize the rich history behind his methodology along with his empathy and charisma.

Read More

Message from the President: Tellyes Project History

Message from the President: Tellyes Project History
By: Valerie Fulmer, ASPE President

ASPE has been engaged in the Tellyes Project for several years: what started as a discussion to spread best practices in SP Methodology has grown into a vibrant curricula spanning continents. Now that the project is charting a strong future, exploring the impetus for this collaborative relationship will give ASPE members an opportunity to gain understanding and to share ideas, thoughts and perspectives moving forward.

Read More

Media Article: Opioid Education Program Boosts PA Students' Confidence in Providing Patient Care

Media Article: Opioid Education Program Boosts PA Students' Confidence in Providing Patient Care
By: Colby Strong, Editor
Submitted by: Janice Radway, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

This article is part of The Clinical Advisor's coverage from the 2018 American Academy of Physician Assistants' annual meeting in New Orleans. The researchers sought to improve the Physician Assistant (PA) didactic curriculum by integrating a lecture series on opioid use disorder followed by standardized patient examinations (SPE) and then assess the effectiveness of this program on students' perceived confidence in their ability to evaluate this patient group.

Read More

ASPE Conference 2018 By the Numbers

ASPE Conference 2018 By the Numbers
By: Todd Lash, Publications Committee Chair

The annual ASPE Conference, “Power of the Past, Force of the Future,” will be held in Kansas City, MO, from Saturday, June 16 – Wednesday, June 20. Each year we like to summarize some numbers to demonstrate the diversity in program offerings.

Read More
1 Comments

Research Article: Challenging Conversations with Simulated Patients

Research Article: Challenging Conversations with Simulated Patients
Lead Author: Diane Dennis
Submitted by: Kerensa Peterson, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

A lot of discussion has been dedicated in recent years to figuring out how the millennial mind works and what makes them excited to learn. In this article, the investigators use simulation with physiotherapy students to engage them in the learning process. Their results are very positive and show us a unique structure for incorporating simulation scenarios with a very large group of learners. Read the full article in The Clinical Teacher here.

Read More

General Interest: The Exam Room Secrecy that Puts Women at Risk

General Interest: The Exam Room Secrecy that Puts Women at Risk
By: Wendy Kline
Submitted by: Katherine Rivlin, MD, The Ohio State University

While this article was published to report about a scandal at the University of Southern California, it contains a nice history of teaching the pelvic exam. A lot of progress has been made in thoughtfully and sensitively teaching this exam, but this article also highlights the need for ongoing diligence and persistence in keeping the momentum going, especially in our current political/cultural environment. A public awareness like this makes the great work our GTAs are doing all the more important! Read the full article in the Washington Post here.

Read More

Research Article: Experiential Learning: Critical Analysis of Standardized Patient and Disability Simulation

Research Article: Experiential Learning: Critical Analysis of Standardized Patient and Disability Simulation
Lead Author: Laura VanPuymbrouck
Submitted by: Janice Radway, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

This paper champions the use of patients with disabilities as SP Educators, or SPWDs in OT education. Traditionally, SPs without disabilities would be used in Disability Simulation, which proved problematic in many ways. The authors offer recommendations such as developing long-term partnerships with disability organizations and involving people with disabilities in the development, implementation, and evaluation of experiential learning opportunities. Together, these recommendations can help ensure that students have access to evidence-based educational approaches and best practices that accurately reflect the self-identified needs, concerns, and priorities of intersectional disability communities. Read the full article in the Journal of Occupational Therapy Education here.

Read More

Research Article: Increasing Confidence and Changing Behaviors in Primary Care Providers Engaged in Genetic Counseling

Research Article: Increasing Confidence and Changing Behaviors in Primary Care Providers Engaged in Genetic Counseling
Lead author: Michael S. Wilkes
Submitted by: Janice Radway, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Screening and counseling for genetic conditions is an increasingly important part of primary care practice, particularly given the paucity of genetic counselors in the United States. However, primary care physicians (PCPs) often have an inadequate understanding of evidence-based screening; communication approaches that encourage shared decision-making; ethical, legal, and social implication (ELSI) issues related to screening for genetic mutations; and the basics of clinical genetics. This study explored whether an interactive, web-based genetics curriculum followed by sessions with Standardized Patients helped make positive change in PCP knowledge and behaviors. Read the full article in BioMed Central Medical Education here.

Read More

General Interest: Losing the ‘Therapeutic Gaze’

General Interest: Losing the ‘Therapeutic Gaze’
By: Howard Wolinsky
Submitted by: Dan Brown, Emory School of Medicine

A patient with several chronic diseases describes his feelings as he encounters physicians who seem increasingly focused on computer screens instead of the patient. His craving for eye contact is palpable, and it drove him to seek out a health technology expert, Enid Montague of DePaul University, who confirms the importance of “the therapeutic gaze” and how effective interfaces allow for minimal eye-to-screen time. As for our profession, this article illuminates the importance of giving feedback on learners’ eye contact while they’re still in the habit-forming stage. Read the full article in at MedPage Today here.

Read More

Media Article: Brush With Death Leads Doctor To Focus On Patient Perspective

Media Article: Brush With Death Leads Doctor To Focus On Patient Perspective
By: Michelle Andrews
Submitted by: Dan Brown, Emory School of Medicine

This article tells the story of Dr. Rana Awdish of the Henry Ford Health System, whose near-fatal rupture in her liver gave her perspective as a patient that inspired a passion for improving empathy in patient communication. She recalls the words of the medical team and the negative emotional impact they had on her and her will to survive. She has since developed CLEAR Conversations, a program which uses SPs to improve conversations between Henry Ford providers and patients. Read the full article at NPR here.

Read More